In the words of our members, we receive far more than we give.

At one of our performances we had the opportunity to witness first hand the fulfillment of our mission. In the front row was a couple. The woman was in a wheelchair and her husband was sitting with his arm around her. She was relaxed, leaning into him, but had a very distant look. As we moved into the audience for our sing along she started to open her eyes. She then began to sing and mouth the words to “Oklahoma”. At then end she clapped. A guest in the audience that had seen her regularly for the past two years said that this was the very first time she had seen the lovely woman talk or react.”— Deb Maschoff, Member since 2008

I have to admit that Opportunity Partners is one of my favorite venues. It truly makes my day to see the joy on the faces of our friends at Opportunity Partners as they sing and dance their way through our performance. We received a special message from Kayla, one of our animated Opportunity Partners audience members that I wanted to share with you: ‘I love to sing! Thank you for taking the time to come to see and sing to us! Thank you for making a difference in so many lives!’ This is why what we do is so important!”— Julia Te Slaa, Member since 2009

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“We were singing at Bridgeview School in St. Paul for an entire gymnasium full of special-needs children and their attendants. During the sing-along I went over to an autistic boy about 10 years of age who was rocking back and forth with his hand in his mouth. I wasn’t sure he was even hearing me, but as I sang, he suddenly dropped his hand and grabbed mine and pulled me toward him, planting a swift kiss on my forehead. He then dropped my hand and went back to rocking, but I knew that he not only heard the music, but was glad we were there. I was overwhelmed!”— Pamela Guthrie, Member since 2000

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The service we give is a source of deep satisfaction. The responses we receive from our audiences are wonderfully rewarding. I can’t imagine my Monday mornings without LeagueAires.”— Marcia Hillestad Seguin, Member since 1986

During one concert, we all were aware of the wispy and fragile old lady sitting in the front row. Her head was bowed and her body barely moved. Was she even hearing us? There was no indication. But when we started ‘The Sound of Music,’ she gently began moving her body, and  soon was weeping. One LeagueAire went and put an arm around her in consolation. The old woman sensed this loving care and leaned into it. It was so compassionate, and to me epitomized what LeagueAires is all about: reaching our dear audiences with music, and understanding and respecting their fragility.”— Laurie Busyn, Member since 1979

Over 30 great years of being a LeagueAire, one of my favorite memories is holding a WWII vet’s trembling hand as we sang ‘America the Beautiful,’ with tears streaming down both our faces.”— Patty Murphy, Member since 1982

“To look out at the audience — no matter how disabled, disadvantaged, compromised, mentally challenged, or in poor health —and to realize there is a story behind each face. For that one moment in time, through a touch and a smile, there is a sense of dignity and caring that takes place for each individual in the audiences, as well as each LeagueAire. An ordinary day can become an extraordinary day for someone. ‘With a smile on our face and a song in our heart,’ we will continue to touch lives one by one!— Jane Ramsland, Member since 1973

I like it when we sing something that causes an audience member to tell a story about their childhood or younger years when they first learned the song. I have been in nearly 25 years and I still remember my first visit to a home after our practices were over. I couldn’t believe how great it felt to fill a real void in the lives of the people we serve.”— Nancy Lindahl, Member since 1990